VR marketing campaigns

5 Stunning VR Marketing Campaigns That Will Inspire Your Next Business Idea

Steal these insanely creative VR marketing campaigns to stand out from the crowd. The truth is that most marketing and promotion doesn’t work if it isn’t stunning or original. Take paid display ads, for instance: only 0.6% of us will actually click on them (and that’s according to Google, who has a lot of skin in the Read more about 5 Stunning VR Marketing Campaigns That Will Inspire Your Next Business Idea[…]

VR Sketch

From Pencil to Polygons: How VR is Revolutionizing the Art World

From Canvas to 4D: How VR is Disrupting the Art World When most of us think about virtual reality, video games, festivals, and advertising often come to mind. Fine art? Not so much. However, virtual reality is starting to make the transition from commercial aesthetics to art, and the results are groundbreaking. Just like how Read more about From Pencil to Polygons: How VR is Revolutionizing the Art World[…]

This Surprising Virtual Reality Marketing Tactic Doubled Marriott’s Customer Demand

See how you can use the technique that doubled demand for Marriott’s services. When it comes to marketing, it’s easy for your voice to get lost in the crowd. Although they do have their place, your Facebook Ads, blog posts — or any other traditional advertising — has to be heard amongst the immense noise and racket. That’s why Read more about This Surprising Virtual Reality Marketing Tactic Doubled Marriott’s Customer Demand[…]

David Hockney and the Seasoned Eye (Guest Post By FIT Professor Tom McManus)

When I was younger, I would see older artists looking at paintings, and I always wanted to know what they were thinking. Well now that I can get a senior discount on my commuter train, I would like to share my thoughts as I visited the David Hockney show at the Met. Initially, I sped Read more about David Hockney and the Seasoned Eye (Guest Post By FIT Professor Tom McManus)[…]

Will Virtual Reality Disrupt The Art World?

The new philosophy “buy experiences, not things” has the art world scrambling. These days, the affluent would rather shell out thousands for a trip to Disney World instead of buying a fine art piece. Don’t just take my word for it, however. According to The Guardian, “New figures show we are continuing to spend less Read more about Will Virtual Reality Disrupt The Art World?[…]

Why the Google Tilt Brush is ‘Groundbreaking’ for Digital Art, According to FIT Experts

A young woman frantically paces around a crowd of onlookers: “I’m…I’m completely speechless.” “I think I’m going to start crying!” No, this isn’t a surprise engagement proposal. A student at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) just witnessed the interior design project she made in SketchUp become seamlessly translated into virtual reality. There’s a stark Read more about Why the Google Tilt Brush is ‘Groundbreaking’ for Digital Art, According to FIT Experts[…]

Interviews on Art Marketing (Part II)

(One of Rick Osaka’s recent works)

 

What does it mean to have an artistic reputation? Is there a line between being a sellout and a savvy businessman? To further investigate this issue, I relied on the help of professionals. A survey was sent out with a list of eight questions to experienced art professionals that would bring insight to the modern role of marketing in art. These people have years of real-world experience dealing with the modern art world and all the business aspects of it. The responses I got ranged from successful art dealers, consultants, artists, curators, and more. Of course there was no one definite answer, as the answers where as varied as these people’s backgrounds. However, there was a general consensus on some issues, and all the responses added valuable and smart insight to the subject.

The short happy life of a radio in Elizabeth Taylor’s hands.

About 20 years ago I met Jordan Ramin, who worked inHollywood as a sound engineer for the producer Michael Todd. Mr. Ramin was a close friend of both Michael Todd and his wife, Elizabeth Taylor. He received the Regency radio in the book inscribed with his name as did about 60 members of the cast and crew who worked on “Around the World in Eighty Days”.

 

Getting into an Art Gallery.

As an artist you are also an art salesman. Especially if you are trying to get in a gallery by going to Thursday night openings. If an art opening starts at 7 get there at 7. The owner will be anxiously milling about wondering if anyone will show up and there you are. Dress noticeably well. Look like you walked out of the pages of Vanity Fair magazine. Do not dress in a painter’s uniform of Dr. Marten’s, tee shirt and paint splattered pants. That look is over. Get a nice suit from a thrift store and have it tailored for about $14. If you are female do not show up in clothes you have made yourself. Do not try to look “interesting”. Get a perfume spritz and buy something hot at Bloomingdale’s. Return it the next day.

Compliment the director/owner on their insight and fine choice of art. Even if, and it surely will be, a horrid a pile of dung. Laugh rotundly at any attempt at nervous wit he or she may proffer.

Hello Sailor!

Curator’s Statement

By Pamela Hart

 

In the world of classic tattoo art, before the image was marked on the body, there was the flash. These bold iconic designs were created by tattooists on sheets of paper and displayed in tattoo parlors. They’re part of the landscape of carnivals, Coney Island, and penny arcades. Look closely at a sheet of tattoo flash and you can almost smell the sweat, cotton candy and popcorn intermingling along the carnival’s dusty corridors. You can hear hawkers urging passersby to check out the bearded lady or take a toss and win a prize. Tattoo flash images caught customers’ attention because of what they represent. They include symbols and signs of love and beauty, of travel or time served, of war and military service. They’re amulets, mementos, or status symbols – occasionally religious, often personal. Whether elaborate or plain, the images suggest romance, travel, patriotism, adventure and perhaps a connection to shadowy subcultures.