Basquiat & Kevin Durant in Brooklyn

The Angry Ironist I noticed an unusually tall man bending down to scrutinize a drawing at the Basquiat show in the Brooklyn Museum. A mesomorph trailed him protectively. I soon realized this towering spectator was a famous basketball player, but I couldn’t place his name since I don’t follow sports. I took his picture anyway Read more about Basquiat & Kevin Durant in Brooklyn[…]

Paul Rand, Art in Advertising

“Mail order advertisers, as we have said, have pictures down to a science.”  Claude Hopkins As you enter the Paul Rand exhibition, you can’t miss a quote of his in a display case filled with his work. It proclaims, “There is no science in advertising.” Advertising has always wanted to be scientific. Clients want to Read more about Paul Rand, Art in Advertising[…]

Juxtapoz Opening Party

By Richard Osaka, Lift Trucks Special ReportBarnsdall Park,Los Angeles I hunted for celebs, Molly, etc.  I was there for over an hour and walked throughout but only spotted Roger Daltrey from The Who.  Didn’t want to take his pic.  Ed Ruscha was there but the only reason I know this is that I saw his Read more about Juxtapoz Opening Party[…]

The Epicenter of Un-Expressionism: N 40’45’ by W 73′ 58′

“Content is a glimpse of something, an encounter like a flash. It’s very tiny – very tiny, content.” – Willem de Kooning We love going to MOMA. What we love best is visiting the lonely and neglected paintings. They seem to need company. Particularly, if one is a work of art that completely changed the Read more about The Epicenter of Un-Expressionism: N 40’45’ by W 73′ 58′[…]

Purple Passion at Woodstock

By the time we got to Woodstock and walked into the Artists Association and Museum, we really needed a cup of coffee. My friend and art colleague Carl Van Brunt invited me to judge an exhibit at the legendary art space,  home to Philip Guston and George Bellows. Got a cup of mud across the Read more about Purple Passion at Woodstock[…]

Interviews on Art Marketing (Part III)

Maria Anna Alp (Left), Alex Guofeng (Middle), and Paul Grosse (Right)

Our third interviewee in this series on art marketing is Paul Grosse, the director of ALP Galleries (alp-galleries.com)

(Mackey) We are interested in your feelings concerning the balance between art and art marketing. For example, there are artists like Takeshi Murakami and Jeff Koons where marketing and manufacturing play a large part in their careers. And there are artists who follow the Van Gogh model who do nothing but focus on art at the expense of their careers. There seems to be a fine line that is constantly shifting between maintaining an artistic reputation and being known as a sellout.

 

Interviews on Art Marketing (Part II)

(One of Rick Osaka’s recent works)

 

What does it mean to have an artistic reputation? Is there a line between being a sellout and a savvy businessman? To further investigate this issue, I relied on the help of professionals. A survey was sent out with a list of eight questions to experienced art professionals that would bring insight to the modern role of marketing in art. These people have years of real-world experience dealing with the modern art world and all the business aspects of it. The responses I got ranged from successful art dealers, consultants, artists, curators, and more. Of course there was no one definite answer, as the answers where as varied as these people’s backgrounds. However, there was a general consensus on some issues, and all the responses added valuable and smart insight to the subject.

Interviews on Art Marketing

ltprojecct.jpg

What does it mean to have an artistic reputation? Is there a line between being a sellout and a savy businessman? To further investigate this issue, I relied on the help of professionals. A survey was sent out with a list of eight questions to experienced art professionals that would bring insight to the modern role of marketing in art. These people have years of real-world experience dealing with the modern art world and all the business aspects of it. The responses I got ranged from successful art dealers, consultants, artists, curators, and more. Of course there was no one definite answer, as the answers where as varied as these people’s backgrounds. However, there was a general consensus on some issues, and all the responses added valuable and smart insight to the subject.

Vote ‘yer Wallet, Matey!

We put Michael Mapes card right up there when the gift kiosk guy wasn’t looking. At the end of the elevators in MoMA. There, but for one brief shining moment with all the greats; De Kooning, Pollock and Picasso. And some lady who was perusing the rack, selected it. Right in front of us. I Read more about Vote ‘yer Wallet, Matey![…]

FA-Q

The Rivington school, despite it’s expensive sounding name (it reminds me of a boarding school parents spend a fortune on to straighten out their “troubled” child), is not a typical school, in fact it’s not even educational. Granted, most art schools aren’t typical (or educational), but throw out the notions of RISD or Pace and instead think cheap booze and NYC clubs. As the artist FA-Q aptly stated, it was “a bunch of nuckleheads (sic) and wannabees” where “society’s outcasts would show up” (at least this guy is honest). The Rivington school started as an offshoot of the latino social club “No Se No”. It was a bar that had an open performance, everything from visual art, to singing, to hanging up a work on the walls. I know, I know, most open performance things are a complete joke (let me give you a hint not to attend any comedy open-mike nite anywhere). However from this movement stemmed some very famous and talented people, including Kevin Wendell (aka F-AQ), Ray Kelly, Taylor Mead, Phoebe Legere, and countless others.